yung_wu_miniWhen you’ve made one perfect record, why make another? Shore Leave, originally released in 1987, is Yung Wu’s sole long-player (though a covers album has circulated privately). It’s a total jangle rock gem, filled with sparkling songwriting, infectious rhythms and gorgeous melodies. But even though the band’s discography is brief, you know the sound: Yung Wu is basically The Feelies with percussionist Dave Weckerman stepping into the frontman role (and keyboardist John Baumgartner contributing as well). Shore Leave provides a logical stepping stone between The Good Earth and Only Life — Glenn Mercer and Bill Millions’ twin guitars soaring and strumming, Stanley Demeski and Brenda Sauter laying down an unshakeable groove. But Weckerman’s songs and vocals have their own eccentric flavor, whether it’s the perfect pop of “Spinning” the “Tomorrow Never Knows”-ish churn of “Return To Zion.” The covers here are ace, too: Neil’s “Powderfinger,” the Stones’ “Child of the Moon” and — best of all — the glorious Manzanera/Eno deep cut “Big Day.” More than just a Feelies footnote, Shore Leave is a necessary listen. words / t wilcox

Yung Wu :: Spinning

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