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    Various Artists

    On The Turntable

    Various Artists :: Skygirl

    15 songs, 51 minutes. One of our favorite compilations of the past few years, Skygirl was originally conceived via French record collectors DJ Sundae and Julien Dechery as “a deeply melancholic and sentimental journey through folk-pop, new wave and art music micro presses that span 1961-1991.” Reissued via the Australian label Efficient Space.

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    Various Artists

    On The Turntable

    Various Artists :: Ongaku: Japanese Environmental, Ambient & New Age Music 1980-1990

    Latest compilation via Light In The Attic as part of their ongoing Japanese Archival Series. This collection looks at this substrata of Japanese music, born out of a growing interest in new computer and synthesizer technology, and, in part, conceived as a reaction to a craze for the piano music of Erik Satie following a series of concerts that took place in 1975.

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    Cochema

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    Cochema :: All My Relations

    On All My Relations, Cochemea Gastelum’s second solo album and first for Daptone Records, the saxophonist offers up a globetrotting swath of sounds, soul music of varying genres. Funk, R&B, Latin jazz, Indigenous chants and stomps, Morrocan Gnawa, cosmic jazz—leading his combo of Daptone stalwarts, Gastelum melds together elements of each to form a multi-faceted, spiritually cohesive tapestry. “Living in this plane, ceremony keeps me in tune with our actual world, where we come from,” Gastelum says from his place in upstate New York. “This record is a reflection of that.”

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    Helado Negro

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    Helado Negro :: This Is How You Smile

    Roberto Carlos Lange, the mind behind Helado Negro, feels like music’s eternal optimist. “Brown won’t go / Brown just glows,” he sings on “Please Won’t Please,” the opener to This Is How You Smile, his new album which first saw daylight last week via Brooklyn’s RVNG Intl. If not the one we deserve, Lange is definitely the hero we need. His music unfolds with a patient grace and an absolutely sublime beauty; his cooing vocals floating gently across electronic atmospheres, radiantly beaming about Latin pride, family, friendship, and love.

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    Moses Boyd

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    Moses Boyd :: Displaced Diaspora

    The contemporary UK jazz scene has been especially potent of late, mutating and redefining various sub-stratas of the genre and its expanding tendrils. Enter: Moses Boyd. This is Displaced Diaspora.

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    Jessica Pratt

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    Jessica Pratt :: Quiet Signs

    Jessica Pratt doesn’t have many contemporaries. Her nylon-string reveries exist in a precarious space between the then and now. Quiet Signs, her latest, is a winter album and is more haunting than anything she’s put out before. It’s less immediate than On Your Own Love Again, her 2015 arrival, but once the melodies work themselves into you, they’re impossible to wash out. You won’t want to, anyway. 

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    Steve Gunn

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    Steve Gunn :: The Unseen in Between

    Working with producer James Elkington and longtime Bob Dylan bassist Tony Garnier, Gunn presents some of his most affecting songs yet. Stepping forward with brilliant confidence, it’s a shady record, concerned with the transparency of liminal spaces, steeped in the unknown, and a reckoning with the loss of his late father.

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    Susumu Yokota

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    Susumu Yokota :: Acid Mt. Fuji 赤富士

    Originally released in 1994, and reissued last year via the Berlin-based Midgar Records, Acid Mt. Fuji marked the debut lp of the late Japanese producer Susumu Yokota. Atmospheric and awash in a myriad of electronic, ambient, textures, the record more than earns its title. Buoyed by an atypical amalgam of numinous field recordings, drones, drum machines, and samples, Fuji’s hour and 14 minute runtime is an indeed a trip. As a recording, its pulsating push, pull and ultimate flow were made for headphones.

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Nick Cave on This Is Elvis (1981 Film)

The motivations behind writing this are twofold. First, as a PSA for those of you who have yet to subscribe to Nick Cave’s weekly email newsletter: The Red Hand Files. Second, to highlight the exceptional 1981 documentary film This Is Elvis — a film Cave references in issue #34. The context for its inclusion is in relation to Cave’s thoughts on the transformative power of music, and specifically how it relates to Presley near the end of his life.

Altered State Radio / April Transmission

Portland selector Mr. Wriff paid a visit to AD HQ last weekend, a visit that dovetailed with the weekly broadcast of his Friday night KMHD radio show, Altered State. We tuned in, and now you can too.

Click the play button as Traver and guest Allen Thayer (The Brazilian Beat), guide a late-night, spirituous journey sampling strains from Brazil, Italy, Poland and beyond.

Pulp :: His ‘n’ Hers

There are a number of stories of artists that took the long road to commercial success, but the story of Pulp is an especially curious one. This is a band that spent significant time in the artistic wilderness — nearly 15 years. And then, suddenly, one album permanently set them into the firmament of Britpop elder statesmen – Blur, Oasis, and Suede in particular. That album, His n Hers, turns 25 today, and its sharp, calculated fission of a decade and a half’s worth of preparation still sounds like a chart-topping album, albeit one from some alternate timeline where some very different things happened in terms of commercial music.

Altin Gün :: Yolcu

Anatolian traditionals reinterpreted/reinvented. Inspired by Turkish folk and psychedelia from the 60s & 70s, the Amsterdam based Altin Gün recorded the entirety of their new album, Gece, directly to 8 track tape. No computers involved. For fans of Ersen, Apaşlar, Moğollar, Erkin Koray, et al.

Fela Kuti :: Unknown Soldier (Pt. 1 & 2)

Music is the weapon. The past ten or so years have witnessed a western appreciation of Fela Kuti that would have seemed implausible just a decade prior. From the Broadway success of the Fela! musical, to the ongoing celebrity-endorsed reissue series, Kuti’s music, and (with it) message have reached a far broader audience than ever achieved during the Nigerian musician’s own lifetime.

Lee Fields: The Aquarium Drunkard Interview

Soul singer Lee Fields reflects on five decades of making music for and with people, discusses the line between the sacred and the secular, and offers up cosmic advice: “The truth isn’t hard. A lie is hard. You have to catch yourself every time. People get caught up in lies, but when you’re dealing with the truth, man, it’s easy.”

The Lagniappe Sessions :: Julian Lynch

It’s been six years since we’ve heard from Julian Lynch. In the interim, he’s taken on guitar duties for Real Estate (those deep, early decade Underwater Peoples roots intact) and relocated to Wisconsin. At the top of this year Lynch re-emerged in solo fashion with Rat’s Spit, a new collection of gauzy bedroom pop and sprawling lo-fi psych. For his first ever Lagniappe Session, Lynch applies his craft to two FM radio dream-pop staples from the early 90’s: Sarah McLachlan’s “Possession” and Madonna’s “Rain.” The artist, in his own words, below.

Catching Up With Peter Prescott

Author and artist Dmitry Samarov’s new book, Music To My Eyes, was released last month via the Chicago based Tortoise Books. A 264 page love letter to independent music, Samarov’s words and minimalist illustrations flow in tandem, presenting a portrait of fandom and appreciation, from Nick Cave to Bill MacKay. Below, Samarov catches up with one of the subjects of his new book, Mission of Burma’s Peter Prescott.

Moses Boyd :: Displaced Diaspora

The contemporary UK jazz scene has been especially potent of late, mutating and redefining various sub-stratas of the genre while extending its tendrils. Moses Boyd’s lp from last Fall, Displaced Diaspora, is one such example. Though its contents date back to sessions cut in 2015, the collection very much provides a succinct overview of where the London based drummer, composer and producer is heading.

Future Museums :: Heavenish

Heavenish, released last month on Aural Canyon, was recorded deep in the hills of Tarpley, Texas, and, not unlike its title, it relishes in something close to nirvana. Spread out across four sprawling instrumentals, Lord and his band merge dusty desert ramblings with ambient soundscapes. A sonic galaxy of guitars, synths, vocal samples, and drum machines.

Mega Bog :: Diary of A Rose

Stretched out and angular art rock from Erin Elizabeth Birgy’s Mega Bog – “Diary of a Rose” is the first taste from Dolphine, her fifth long player and first on her new label home of Paradise of Bachelors. Rooted in guitar-driven post-punk, the piece flourishes with synths, squeaks, and feedback, sending it way out into the wilderness and back again.