On The Turntable

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    Neil Young

    Neil Young :: Homegrown

    Considered one of the holy grails of the “lost” Neil Young album, the deeply-mythologized Homegrown finally sees an official release this summer, since being shelved by Young in 1975 in place of Tonight’s the Night. The alternate timeline here presents an almost, bizarre Ditch-trilogy version of Harvest. A plaintive and fertile country soil sets the stage, soaked in wistful pedal-steel, but populated by agitated demons.

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    Alabaster DePlume

    Alabaster DePlume :: To Cy & Lee: Instrumentals Vol. 1

    To Cy & Lee is an absolutely gorgeous hybrid, bringing together Ethio-jazz, Britfolk, pastoral/spiritual vibes and more. The mood is somehow both restful and restless as DePlume weaves a rich sonic tapestry. Strings, flutes, guitars, piano, gentle percussion … It feels like springtime is here again.

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    Nina Simone

    Nina Simone :: Fodder on My Wings

    Recorded shortly after her move to Paris, Nina Simone’s Fodder on My Wings was, for almost three decades, relegated to its obscure 1982 French-only release. Finally reissued for the masses earlier this year, the album opens a window into a previously unknown part of the songstress’ career, exorcising her grief and ghosts through excursions in calypso, jazz, and funk, as well as haunted folk chants and, in moments such as the mystifying title track and a breathtaking stark telling of her father’s passing, fusions of a baroque soul and playful outsider pop. Simone has been historically remembered as aloof during this period in her life, but on these songs she bears her soul naked.

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    Jon Mckiel

    Jon Mckiel :: Bobby Joe Hope

    Hailing from Nova Scotia, Jon Mckiel has created one of the great sleeper records of the year. Patching samples from an unknown origin found in a used Teac A-2340 with a wistful cosmic country air, he has made something immediately timeless. As much a Sunday morning coffee record as it is a long, humid summer evening. Lo-fi psychedelic rock, echo-chambers of noise, and bedroom soul converse in an imaginative world where Broadcast and Cotton Jones might have jammed together.

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    Mosses

    Mosses :: T.V. Sun

    A collaboration between Ryan Jewell and Danette Bordenkircher, the debut full-length from Mosses is a kaleidoscopic trip, encompassing a wide swathe of psychedelia. We’ve got Barrett-era Floyd mayhem, Can-y jams, Espers-esque folk (Meg Baird even drops in for a guest spot), OG Modern Lovers boogies and much more …

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    Leo Takami

    Leo Takami :: Felis Catus and Silence

    The Tokyo-based composer and guitarist crafts an enthusiastically imaginative blend of new age sounds, shaping Windham Hill-inspired guitar compositions with elements of jazz, minimalism, classical music, Japanese gagaku, and ambient textures.

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    Pure X

    Pure X :: Pure X

    Such elegies make for unintended eeriness in 2020. America, like rock ‘n roll, can be seduced by myths of its own destruction. And yet this is the sound of a band once again living for its music. What Pure X is bearing witness to, unmistakably, is its own will to rebirth.

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    Brigid Mae Power

    Brigid Mae Power :: Head Above the Water

    The first taste from the Irish singer/songwriter’s third long player—the lush “On a City Night”—is an organ and pedal steel-soaked country shuffle. Plaintively furtive in its imagery, the tune plays like a deceptive still life; its characters in a state of suspended animation while the world blurs in motion.

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Transmissions :: Don Bryant

Our guest today on Transmissions is Don Bryant. Born in Memphis, Tennessee, he was one of the premier songwriters at Hi Records, writing for Al Green, O.V. Wright, Syl Johnson, and his wife, Ann Peebles. His new album is called You Make Me Feel. Bryant joins us to discuss it, highlights from his massive songbook, and his marriage and creative partnership with Ann Peebles.

Powers/Rolin Duo

The hammered dulcimer has been played all over the world for more than 1,000 years. But the vast possibilities of the instrument are still being explored. Case in point: Powers/Rolin Duo’s self-titled LP on Feeding Tube Records. Here, Jen Powers uses the hammered dulcimer to create a rippling, reverberant sound, something both minimal and expansive.

Transmissions :: Joe Casey of Protomartyr

This week on our weekly talk show, Transmissions: Joe Casey of Protomartyr. One of the most exciting rock bands of the last decade, the Detroit-based post punk band will release its fifth album, Ultimate Success Today July 17th. The word prophetic isn’t a stretch. With its references to disease, institutional brutality, and gross inequality—symptoms of “a cosmic grief, beyond all comprehension”—the new record matches the apocalyptic mood of the US, and much of the world, in 2020. But it also speaks to the continued growth of the Protomartyr aesthetic, pairing contributions by players associated with free jazz and experimental music with post-punk rhythms.

Lou Turner :: Songs For John Venn

But however eclectic Songs For John Venn gets, the album is held together firmly by Lou Turner’s singular lyrics and perfectly breezy vocals. She can make even the most tongue-twisted of lines sound as natural as a conversation with friends, blending wry humor with piercing observations, stony wonderings with crystal clear vision. These tunes follow their own weird inner logic but remain altogether accessible for the casual listener — a neat trick, indeed.

Whit Dickey :: The Aquarium Drunkard Interview

On the surface, nothing about Whit Dickey’s decision to start his new record label, Tao Forms, makes much sense. It’s the drummer’s first time leading such a venture, and he’s doing so in his mid-60s, right around the time most impresarios are looking toward retirement. Too, he’s using Tao Forms as outlet for free jazz (his own as well as music by Mathew Shipp). Not the soundest of commercial moves—especially amid a global pandemic—but that has never seemed to be his concern.

Jon Mckiel :: Bobby Joe Hope

Patching samples from an unknown origin found in a used Teac A-2340 with a wistful cosmic country air, he has made something immediately timeless. As much a Sunday morning coffee record as it is a long, humid summer evening. Lo-fi psychedelic rock, echo-chambers of noise, and bedroom soul converse in an imaginative world where Broadcast and Cotton Jones might have jammed together.