On The Turntable

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    Female Species

    Female Species :: Tale of My Lost Love

    With the release of Tale of My Lost Love, the story of Female Species—sisters Vicki and Ronni Gossett—moves out of Numero Group’s cabinet of curios and into the full retrospective treatment, and, man, do the songs and story ever warrant it. The Gossetts sound shifted through the decades, first from girl group to garage rock, then to psychedelic pop and lounge, and finally to glossy Nashville pop sheen.

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    Rolling Stones

    Rolling Stones :: More Hot Rocks (Big Hits & Fazed Cookies)

    The ugly kid brother to Hot Rocks, vol, 1 with the cooler title. Yes, you need this. “But why, AD, I already own those records?” We know. You still need this. A glorious mess with weird sequencing, and a double lp at that. Hail, hail rocknroll, etc.

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    Niney the Observer & Friends

    Niney the Observer & Friends :: Bring the Couchie (1974-1976)

    Super tuff roots-reggae compilation dropped by Trojan Records in the late ’80s. While it’s now available via the streaming services, we recommended skipping that, and picking up the wax on Discogs for a cool 9 bucks. You deserve it.

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    Pugh Rogefeldt

    Pugh Rogefeldt :: Ja, Dä Ä Dä!

    Kicking off with an absolutely filthy drum break (“Love, Love, Love”), the record finds Rogefeldt transmuting all manner of rock, pop, raga, folk and soul. Sung in his native Swedish, the 10 track record is seamlessly duct taped together by Rogefeldt’s percussive vocals and syncopated howls, grunts and exaltations.

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    Writhing Squares

    Writhing Squares :: Chart For The Solution

    Writhing Squares—the Philadelphia based duo of Kevin Nickles and Daniel Provenzano—bely their own spartan approach on their new lp Chart For The Solution, employing bass, horns, and drum machine to intergalactic effect. The outfit brings a sprawling 70-minute affair to the table with patch-working motorik rhythms, ambient synth trances, post-punk dub, and psychedelic shredders.

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    Rob Jo Star Band

    Rob Jo Star Band :: Rob Jo Star Band

    Early ’70s slab of sci-fi Parisian proto-punk. Distortion. Electronics. Exclamations. Messe pour un temps présent. Press play, and call on one’s muse.

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    Stack Waddy

    Stack Waddy :: So Who The Hell Is Stack Waddy?

    In 1972 Stack Waddy’s second and final effort, Bugger Off!, posed the question “could ‘Willie The Pimp’ really get any nastier?”, and then proceeded to answer it with an emphatic, phlegmy, “yes.” Proto-punk in form and approach, the four-piece were signed to John Peel’s Dandelion label, knocking out a pair of lps before calling it in 1973.

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    Tone Scientists

    Tone Scientists :: Tiny Pyramids (Sun Ra)

    True to the 1974 Arkestra original, the ad hoc group ride a heavy Pungi-like groove throughout. With percussion buoyed by jazzist Vince Meghrouni and Tortoise’s John Herndon, session producer Mike Watt fills in on bass duties with Pete Mazich on keys. Saturn music endures …

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The Invasion Of Thunderbolt Pagoda: Mylar Hallucinations & Sonic Drones

Originally screened in 1968, The Invasion of Thunderbolt Pagoda is one of the most evergreen time capsules from the apex of the psychedelic movement. Shot on 16mm and directed by poet and photographer Ira Cohen, the twenty-two minute long film showcases Cohen’s signature use of “mylar photography,” an optical technique has since become a kind of aesthetic shorthand for psychedelia; visually synonymous with the “tune in, drop out” philosophy of the hippie counterculture.

The Aquarium Drunkard Picture Show: Season II

It’s back. Reverberating from the hills of Glassell Park, California, welcome to season 2 of the Aquarium Drunkard Picture Show — a half-hour audio/visual crudités featuring Terry Riley, Brigitte Fontaine, Dennis Wilson, Soft Machine, Sessa, The Monks, Julien Gasc, Arthur Brown, Tim Presley, John Andrews & The Yawns, Pink Floyd & more …

Writhing Squares :: Chart For The Solution

Writhing Squares—the Philadelphia based duo of Kevin Nickles and Daniel Provenzano—bely their own spartan approach on their new lp Chart For The Solution, employing bass, horns, and drum machine to intergalactic effect. The outfit brings a sprawling 70-minute affair to the table with patch-working motorik rhythms, ambient synth trances, post-punk dub, and psychedelic shredders.

Apifera :: The Aquarium Drunkard Interview

Like most musicians that work in the nebulous worlds of jazz and beat music in Israel, the four members of Apifera have been crossing paths with one another for years. With Overstand, they tap into that deep sense of connection with a blend of spiritual jazz, psychedelic R&B, and J. Dilla-inspired beats.

Pino Palladino & Blake Mills :: Transmissions

Pino Palladino and Blake Mills are two of the most dynamic studio wizards in music and they join us this week on Transmissions to discuss Notes With Attachments, their Impulse! Records-released collaborative long-player. Known for their individual collaborations with artists like Bob Dylan, D’Angelo, The Who, Fiona Apple, and Brittany Howard, these two go completely unexpected places as they unite for a set of jazzy instruments that blur the lines between J. Dilla flips, Cuban shuffles, and West African lock grooves.

Female Species :: Till The Moon Don’t Shine

With the release of Tale of My Lost Love, the story of Female Species—sisters Vicki and Ronni Gossett—moves out of Numero Group’s cabinet of curios and into the full retrospective treatment, and, man, do the songs and story ever warrant it. The Gossetts sound shifted through the decades, first from girl group to garage rock, then to psychedelic pop and lounge, and finally to glossy Nashville pop sheen.

Bandcamping :: Spring 2021

Just about a year ago, we were settling into a weird new normal of lockdowns, quarantines and social distancing. One bright spot amidst the gloom was the emergence of a new monthly holiday for music lovers — Bandcamp Friday, during which the outfit waived its usual fees and gave artists a much-needed financial boost. The tradition continues in 2021 — the next one hits on May 7.

Henri Salvador :: Homme Studio 1969-78

A late career re-birth at fifty, following his break from the showbiz world, Henri Salvador found himself in self-imposed exile with his wife, working from his living room, self producing. Marginalized but free, these homespun efforts have finally been comped on Homme Studio 1969-1978, via the Paris based Born Bad Records.

Waylon Jennings And Friends :: Tribute to Sue Brewer

A mighty guitar pull, hoss. Filmed in Nashville for television in 1984, we find Waylon Jennings playing host to bevy of living legends in celebration of the late Sue Brewer. Decades long de facto den mother, and champion of upcoming Music City singer-songwriters, Brewer’s 18th Avenue apartment served as a makeshift clubhouse / after-hours performance space for the scene’s burgeoning community including Kris Kristofferson, Waylon Jennings, Roger Miller, Harlan Howard, and Willie Nelson. To be the fly on those walls.