Spiritual Jazz Sunday

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The following began as a set I compiled on CD-R for personal listening on – as the title suggests –  Sundays. Over time I shared it with a few friends who then shared it with theirs. And now…technology. Below is the streaming version, save a few tracks unavailable by the digital gods. 36 tracks, four and half hours into the metaphysical and beyond.

Spiritual Jazz Sunday (Spotify)

John Coltrane – Welcome
Donald Brrd – Elijah
Alice Coltrane – Huntington Ashram Monastery
Pharoah Sanders – Astral Traveling
Sonny Sharrock – Once Upon A Time
Old And New Dreams – Mopti
Joe Henderson w/ Alice Coltrane – Earth
Azar Lawrence – Bridge Into The New Age
Kamasi Washington – Change of The Guard
Yusef Lateef – Morning
John Coltrane Quartet – Spiritual
Rahsaan Roland Kirk – Spirits Up Above
Don Cherry – Malkauns
Sonny Sharrock – Black Woman
McCoy Tyner – Makin’ Out
John Coltrane – A Love Supreme, Pt. 1 – Acknowledgment
Albert Ayler – Our Prayer
Tony Scott – Kundalina – Serpent Power
Alice Coltrane w/ Pharoah Sanders – Journey Into Satchidananda
Bernie Maupin – Past + Present = Future
Pharoah Sanders – Japan
Lloyd Miller & The Heliocentrics – Spiritual jazz
Sun Ran – Plutonian Nights
Kelan Philip Cohran & The Hypnotic Brass Ensemble
Creative Arts Ensemble – Uhuru
Lonnie Liston Smith – Astral Traveling
Azar Lawrence – Fatisha
Michael White – The Blessing Song
McCoy Tyner – His Blessings
Brother Ah – Sekou
Salah Ragab & The Cairo Jazz Band – Neveen
Maurice McIntyre – Humility In Light Of The Creator
Alice Coltrane – Turiya & Ramakrishna
Pharoah Sanders – Summun, Bukmun, Umyun
Albert Ayler – Music Is The Jealing Force of The Universe
Charlie Haden – We Shall Overcome

Related: Abstract Truths: An Evolving Jazz Compendium – Volume 1-6

5 thoughts on “Spiritual Jazz Sunday

  1. I’m always on the lookout for ways to expand my Jazz horizons. An Aquarium Drunkard mix seems like exactly what I need. Thanks.

  2. You should really check out Binker and Moses ‘Alive in the East?’

    ‘The River’s Tale’ is a good starting point.

  3. Yes, but in an interesting way – as in young British black musicians who’ve collaborated with African musicians – you can hear that in the drumming and the way the harp is used.
    The collobration with Evan Parker here is really interesting, as think it pushes both of them out of their comfort zone (it was a live gig with an audience dancing – not really Parker’s usual crowd, although it was his home territory).

    It’s rough / feels like music made in C21st London, where UK jazz has often been either smooth, or right over in the improv/free jazz corner.

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